The Golden Tap Awards, Ontario’s most democratic beer awards event, has launched its voting for 2016.  Now in its fourteenth year, the Golden Tap Awards recognize the best in beer and cider in Ontario, across breweries, beers, brewpubs, cideries, bars and more. All voting is determined by the beer loving... > READ MORE

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Golden Tap Awards 2016 Voting Launches

Golden Tap Awards 2016 Voting Launches

The Golden Tap Awards, Ontario’s most democratic beer awards event, has launched its voting for 2016.  Now in its fourteenth year, the Golden Tap Awards recognize the best in beer and cider in Ontario, across breweries, beers, brewpubs, cideries, bars and more. All voting is determined by the beer loving general public.

Awards will be handed out in the following categories at a gala event at beerbistro in Toronto on Thursday, September 22nd as a part of Toronto Beer Week:

  • Best craft brewery in Ontario
  • Best bar in Ontario for draught beer selection
  • Best bar in Ontario for bottled and/or canned beer selection
  • Best brewpub or tied house in Ontario
  • Best regularly-produced craft beer in Ontario
  • Best seasonal, limited release or specialty craft beer in Ontario
  • Best craft cidery in Ontario
  • Design Award: For the best packaging design, label artwork and branding in Ontario
  • Innovation Award: For pushing the boundaries of craft brewing the furthest in Ontario
  • Newcomer Award (Bar): For the best craft beer bar or restaurant that is new to Ontario
  • Newcomer Award (Brewery): For the best craft brewery or brewpub that is new to Ontario
  • Event Award: For the best beer event that took place in the past year in Ontario
  • Staff Award: For the best (most beer-knowledgeable, friendly) staff in Ontario
  • Beer Writer Award: For the best beer writer (print, digital or other) in Ontario
  • Brewmaster’s Choice: For the best beer in Ontario, as decided by the craft brewers themselves

The Awards event will feature an all-Ontario craft beer festival, with all of beerbistro’s tap lines and a bottle station exclusively serving Ontario beers.  Admission to the Golden Tap Awards is free and no tickets are required.  Please vote for your favourites now and we hope to see you at the awards ceremony!

Tapping into Some New Kegs for Ontario

Tapping into Some New Kegs for Ontario

For those of you who know me, I have long criticized the archaic keg importation and distribution system in Ontario. It is one that is legacy at its finest, something that favours a few select companies, has not kept up with the changing beer times and ultimately has affected the potential selection that Ontario beer consumers could have on draught in the province.

To summarize the system, the only way for a local brewery agent to import a keg for in-bar sale in Ontario is to pay a significant listing fee and have it distributed by The Beer Store, or negotiate with one of three private companies (Premier Brands, Premium Beer and Diageo), who were granted authorization by the LCBO to distribute kegs. However, as these companies are brewery agents themselves, a natural conflict of interest arises when it comes to distributing the kegs of others. This was not such of an issue when the agreements were first forged many years ago, however recently with the influx of new brewery agents in Ontario, this means that many potential brands looking to get on tap in the market had to play by out of date and unfair rules. If you would like to read an in-depth analysis of the keg distribution system in Ontario, I encourage you to read Ben Johnson’s here.

However, agents perserved. Any import beer you’ve had on tap up to the present day has been technically distributed by one of the above companies, even if their local agent is another entity. A popular agent in Toronto struck a deal with one of the private companies, and their brands on draught are distributed through them. Others have agreed to pay The Beer Store’s listing fees and have brands on tap through them. Some have forgone either of these scenarios in the hopes that the system may change for the better.

Well, almost unbelievably so, perhaps it may be. The LCBO is piloting a new project whereby they will be directly importing small (up to 18L), one-way, recyclyable kegs through their Specialty Services department, which oversees Private Ordering and Consignment, two areas where a significant amount of premium bottled beers are imported through and distributed to agents, and in turn to bars and restaurants.

What does this mean? For one, agents can now request to order these small kegs as they would bottles or cans, bypassing The Beer Store or one of the three other private companies. This cuts out a huge layer of complexity, cost and conflict from the equation and potentially opens the market up for premium imported draught like we haven’t seen in Ontario ever before. Since the current system required a decent amount of volume to make it worthwhile, this new scenario allows for single or small volume keg orders with lower overhead to reach bars and restaurants. That’s not something we’ve ever had in Ontario, except possibly for those who may have attended a Saloon League event.

The potential of this is significant. Agents could theoretically bring in kegs to test the market, without making a larger commitment to a brand on draught as is the case now. Festivals could work with agents to bring in one-off kegs in a way that was otherwise not realistic. Bars and restaurants could work with agents or breweries to bring in seasonal, one-off or other interesting kegs, again something that just wasn’t feasible in the past. Now of course, the kegs need to conform to the LCBO’s outlined packaging standards, but one-way kegs have been increasing in popularity in recent years, presumaby due to ease of shipping and distribution.

We have seen in Ontario over the past number of years small step changes when it comes to the beer marketplace. As this is a pilot with numerous conditions, it is consistent with the philosophy of doing a little bit rather than drastic change. However, it is a step in the right direction to loosen one of Ontario’s most restrictive, complicated and unfair beer practices. That is something worth having a fresh glass of draught to celebrate.

Warm Smiles and Cold Beers at Cruz Blanca

Warm Smiles and Cold Beers at Cruz Blanca

The bar on the main floor of Cruz Blanca.With so many breweries opening up nowadays (620 did in 2015 according to the Brewers Association), it is sometimes hard to get excited for a specific one to debut.  But there was much excitement this summer when Cruz Blanca, the new brewery from Rick Bayless, the restaurateur behind Chicago’s Frontera Grill, Topolobampo and Xoco, opened its doors.  Mr. Bayless is a legend in the Mexican cuisine world, a Michelin-starred chef known for creativity, accessibility, authenticity and passion.  And when we learned that he and his team were going to get into the brewing world, we began tracking the progress of his new venture with great anticipation.

Cruz Blanca is located in the West Loop neighbourhood of Chicago, an incredibly lively food and drink haven already home to The Publican, brewpub Haymarket, famed restaurant Girl and the Goat and its sister Little Goat Diner, the Three Floyds-focused pub Lone Wolf and the delicious Green Street Smoked Meats.  The area has transformed from a meatpacking district to a day and night playground for the senses with no indication of slowing down.  And with the simultaneous openings of Cruz Blanca and its adjoining neighbour Leña Brava (also by Rick Bayless), the area became even more of a magnet for food and drink lovers.

2nd floor taproom is usually open.Upon entering the attractively designed space one is immediately greeted with two options: the Cruz Blanca “Cervecería” or “Taquería”.  Beers are available directly from the 10-seat-long bar located on the left hand side of the room, and tacos are available from the counter located to the right.  Numerous communal tables (no reservations here) fill the space along with a front patio on Randolph Street.  A second taproom sits above the main room, featuring another long bar adorned with TV screens, although the large windows overlooking Randolph are equally if not more interesting.  Bar or counter service is the rule of the house, which means less waiting for a delicious beer which is very much appreciated.

There’s a story to this new brewery, one rooted in Mexican brewing history.  Emil Dercher was a European who left France to Mexico City in the 1860s and opened one of the first breweries there, naming it Cruz Blanca.  With this inspiration, the new Cruz Blanca brews interpretations of German, French and Austrian styles as would have been present in Mexico City during the original incarnation, but with a modern twist and featuring unique ingredients from the present day.

A view from Cruz Blanca's brewhouse.The three-level establishment integrates the brewery throughout the space.  On the upper floor lies the grain mill, feeding the 10 barrel Newlands brewhouse located behind the bar on the ground level.  From there bright tanks live in the basement directly feeding the main bar, as do a few more behind the bar on the top floor.  A immaculate cold room is also present on the lower level for kegs and guest brews.  Coming soon to the brewery is a bottle filler and a barrel program to even further the capability of this impressive new operation.

Cruz Blanca’s house brews are anchored by a trio of bière de garde styles under the La Guardia banner: Rubia, Ambar and Morena.  With consistent yeast and hops across all three brews, each beer has a unique malt bill and featured ingredient.  The Rubia, the lightest of the three clocking in at 6.8% is a sweet, orange coloured brew with local Illinois honey; Ambar features Mexican hominy at 7.5%; and the boozy Morena packs a punch at 9% with Mexican Piloncillo sugar resulting in a lingering sweetness.  A common theme amongst Rick Bayless’ restaurants is their commitment to local farms, and their beers follow this philosophy, as malts in their beers are from the Sugar Creek Malt Co. in northern Indiana.

Communal seating on the main floor of Cruz Blanca.Other beers in the house lineup include Smoke Alley, a 4% delicately smoked wheat ale inspired by Oaxaca’s taco corridor of the same name, Winnow, a rich and delicious 6.9% American porter made with cocoa bean husks from sister restaurant Xoco, and Básica, the hoppiest beer of the bunch, a crisp 6% wheat lager made with Chinook and Cascade hops.  The beers of Cruz Blanca are unique and interesting, accessible but flavourful.  It is clear that they do not follow the traditional pattern of new brewpubs today, but have carved their own path of originality with stories behind each recipe and the quality to match.  The remaining taps featured guest brews from local breweries that helped with the pilot batches as Cruz Blanca was getting up and running, including Perennial, Penrose, Revolution, Half Acre and Metropolitan, but in recent days more house brews have been coming on the line (a Vienna Lager and Hoppy Kolsch were in the works during our visit).  After only a few short weeks from visiting there is already more new to try.

Cruz Blanca's taco counter for delicious bites.

Cruz Blanca also features a daily radler, with a rotating agua fresca flavour mixed with Smoke Alley (and a mezcal option to turbocharge that), along with beer-to-go in freshly-poured growler (64 oz.) or howler (32 oz.) form.  And what would a Rick Bayless restaurant be without Mexican cuisine, and Cruz Blanca delivers with an all-fire kitchen (no gas lines in the building) featuring steak, pork, chicken, chorizo and mushroom tacos, alongside other snacks and sides.  As Todd White, Lead Bartender and Assistant Manager put it, “Come in, find a spot and make it your own”.  This encouraging rule is evident at Cruz Blanca: it is a welcoming spot to try many delicious varieties of beer and food where one could easily settle in for an entire day exploring the many tastes of this dynamic new brewery and taqueria.

After the visit, I was thrilled to be able to chat with Jacob Sembrano, Head Brewer of Cruz Blanca about his beers and brewery.  Please give it a listen below or via iTunes:

 

Cruz Blanca is an excellent addition to the already dynamic beer scene of Chicago.  Its beer list breaks the mold for most new breweries with a lineup full of unique beers made with interesting stories and ingredients.  The design is top notch, the beers are delicious and the experience is friendly and memorable.  As complex of an operation as Cruz Blanca is, their mantra was described to us as “warm smiles, cold beer.”  And here, there’s nothing else we’d rather have.

Cruz Blanca is located at 904 W. Randolph Street in Chicago, Illinois.  The brewery and taqueria is open from 11am until 11pm from Tuesday-Thursday, until midnight on Friday and Saturday, until 9pm on Sunday, and closed Monday.  Special thanks to Head Brewer Jacob Sembrano and Lead Bartender and Assistant Manager Todd White for their generous participation in this feature.

Lester P. Beerson Celebrates Canada Day

Lester P. Beerson Celebrates Canada Day

BBY_July_v1The Brewer’s Backyard returns on Canada Day, Friday, July 1st with Lester P. Beerson Day, a celebration of Canada, great beer and delicious food at Toronto’s most open beer festival.

At the Evergreen Brick Works the event will feature breweries Great Lakes BreweryHenderson BrewingPitschfork BrewingDurhamRailway City Brewing and Brimstone Brewing, alongside food from Kanga Meat PiesFood Dudes, Urban Carnivore, Fidel Gastro’s and The Pop Stand.

Lester P. Beerson Day runs from 12pm-5pm on Friday, July 1st at the Koerner Gardens and CRH Gallery areas of the Evergreen Brick Works.  The Brewer’s Backyard is Toronto’s most open beer festival: admission is free, it is all-ages, family-friendly and all are welcomed.  Beer and food is available for individual purchase at the event. Please note that our last beer sales is at 4:30pm and last beer poured is at 4:45pm.

Please note that for the summer the Evergreen shuttle bus pickup and drop off has relocated to Chester Station.  The TTC Bayview South bus from Davisville Station runs seven days a week.

Crack into a Homebrew in Baltimore

Crack into a Homebrew in Baltimore

The Bar Towel is proud to present our annual preview of the American Homebrewers Association (AHA) National Homebrewers Conference, now known as Homebrew Con, taking place from June 9th to 11th, 2016 in Baltimore, Maryland. This article will cover highlights of the conference as well as recommended beer destinations in Baltimore. The photo above is courtesy Visit Baltimore.

Baltimore is a city that you’re probably quite familiar with, but perhaps one you don’t know a great detail about.  You surely know it as a port city, located on the east coast of the U.S., a harbour town on the Patapsco River, which connects to the Chesapeake Bay and onto the Atlantic Ocean.  You likely know that people here love Maryland Blue Crabs from those waters, amongst other great foods, from both sea and land.  You probably know that the famous show The Wire was set in Baltimore, and potentially that the equally famous film The Silence of the Lambs was too.  You likely know a bit about Baltimore’s sports history, such as being the hometown of baseball legend Babe Ruth, the career home team for Hall of Famer and Toronto Blue Jay nemesis Cal Ripken, or the only U.S. city to win the CFL’s Grey Cup.  You might know about its famous residents including writer Edgar Allan Poe or filmmaker John Waters.  And you possibly know that the Star Spangled Banner flag was created here (in a brewery no less), and that the anthem was written here thanks to inspiration from the aforementioned flag.

While you’re most certainly familiar with these interesting facts about Baltimore, something you might not be familiar with is the city’s beer scene.  But for homebrewers in North America, that’s about to change.

Baltimore is the host city for this year’s National Homebrewers Conference, organized by the American Homebrewers Association from June 9th to 11th.  Similar to its sister event the Craft Brewers Conference, the Homebrew Con (as it’s now nicknamed, although the National Homebrewers Conference remains an official name) is the largest of its kind in North America, attracting amateur brewers to mingle, learn and more importantly taste beers made right in the homes of the continent by some of the most passionate beer people out there.

Baltimore at night. Photo courtesy Visit Baltimore.

Baltimore at night. Photo courtesy Visit Baltimore.

The Homebrew Con returns to Baltimore for the first time since 2005 (it also hosted in 1995), but demonstrating the growth of the conference, it is being held this year at the Baltimore Convention Center versus at a hotel like previous years in other cities.  But similar to previous years, the conference is acts not only gathering of homebrewers, but a showcase for a local beer scene.  Although Baltimore may not spring to mind as one of the top beer cities in the U.S., the Homebrew Con does a nice job of showcasing some of the smaller markets in the country, as in recent years Bellevue, Washington, Cincinnati, Ohio and Grand Rapids, Michigan amongst others have played host.

Let’s start with the conference and then we’ll talk about the beer scene in Baltimore.  The conference itself is comprised of education, competition and sociability.  There is the National Homebrew Competition, a large scale event whereby the finalists are judged at the conference, and announced during the Grand Banquet and Awards Ceremony to close out the weekend.  Informative seminars line each day of the conference, hosted by both amateur and professional brewers alike.  Throughout each day there is the Homebrew Expo and Social Club, a trade show of sorts for brewing equipment and other homebrew gear and gadgets, paired with numerous beers from across the country.  And then there’s the evening events, including a professional brewer festival and Club Night, a homebrew gathering, drink-up and immersive beer entertainment experience that needs to be seen to be believed.

One of the most unique aspects of the Homebrew Con (at least to those familiar with the rigid rules of Ontario), is the presence of homebrew beer at the conference.  So not only can an attendee of Homebrew Con imbibe in the beers of the local professional brewers (and beyond), they can sample the efforts of fellow amateur brewers.  This gives the conference a true air of authenticity and celebration, as you can stand side-by-side with brewers from all levels of beer experience and enjoy some delicious concoctions.

I truly recommend everything at the Homebrew Con – if you’re a fan of beer and brewing you can’t go wrong with anything that’s happening.  But there’s a lot of seminars that take place during the conference, and it’s impossible to see everything.  So, herewith are my picks for the seminars of the conference worth checking out, ones that I find particularly interesting, and you might too.

Thursday, June 9th

  • 9:00am: 2016 State of the Homebrew Industry.  Brewers Association beer economist Bart Watson is a smart and knowledgeable fellow, and like his seminar of the same topic for the professional industry during the CBC, this one will be a great overview of what’s happening in the homebrew scene from a data analysis perspective.  Speaking alongside Bart will be Jake Keeler and Steve Parr from the AHA.
  • 2:00pm: How to Brew Like and All-Star.  Speakers Denny Conn and Drew Beechum are well-known in the homebrew scene, are a genuinely entertaining pair and definitely worth sitting in on their talk.  They reprise this seminar at 2pm on Saturday if you can’t make it for this one.
  • 5:00pm: Keynote Address. It is admirable to see so many well known professional brewers staying close to the amateur brewing community, passing on their knowledge and experience and keeping their street cred in tact.  In fact, I’ve noticed in the past more ‘celebrity’ professional brewers roaming about the Homebrew Con than the CBC itself.  To that end, this year’s Keynote Address is being delivered by someone who definitely embodies the ideal of staying close to the community, Dogfish Head’s Sam Calagione.

Friday, June 10th

  • 10:15am: History of Baltimore Brewing.  You’re in Baltimore, so you might as well learn about the local beer scene outside of Colt 45 and Natty Boh.  Speaker Rob Kasper, longtime columnist for the Baltimore Sun and founding member of Baltimore Beer Week, will certainly have some interesting tales and stories.
  • 10:15am: Return of the Mead Panel.  Shout out to Canadian homebrewer Ryan Chaytor, who’s on this panel about mead alongside Ken Schramm, Curt Stock, Michael Fairbrother and Steve Platz.
  • 10:15am: Unlocking the Genetic Code of Brewing Strains.  Chris White is a smart dude.  He’s the founder of White Labs, where many homebrewers saw up close in San Diego at last year’s conference what they are all about, which is the ultra science behind beer.  Listen to him and learn.
  • 2:00pm: Homebrewing History: A Photographic Tour with Charlie.  If you say the name “Charlie” to any homebrewer who knows the difference between hops and malts, a last name won’t be necessary.  Charlie Papazian is a legend in the homebrewing scene and helped popularize it to a generation of brewers.  A walk down memory lane with him will certainly be entertaining and informative.
  • 2:00pm: Brewing up a Perfect Pairing: Research-Backed Food Pairing Principles.  Randy Mosher is well-known in the scene as a brewer and author, and alongside Pat Fahey this will certainly be a good session about beer and food pairing.

Saturday, June 11th

  • 10:15am: Modern Homebrew Recipes. Gordon Strong knows his stuff as president of BJCP, author and award-winning brewer.  If he’s got a recipe to share or a secret about how to do them right, I’d like to hear it.
  • 2:00pm: Wild Alaska, Wild Ingredients.  Alaska Brewing co-founder Geoff Larson presents a talk about the wild ingredients of Alaska and their usage in beer.  Although for most Canadians Alaska is quite a ways away, many of us can relate to the frozen tundra, so learning about how cold-weather goodies could be a part of beer would be good knowledge to have.
  • 2:00pm: Hoppy Sour Beers: Taking the Bitter of of IPA.  There’s a number of sour sessions this year (including ‘Launching a Communal Sours Program’, Saturday 10:15am; ‘A Timeline for Sour Beer: How to get the Flavors you Want, When you Want them’, Friday 2:00pm; and ‘Trouble-Free Tart Beers: Alternative Souring Methods’, Thursday 3:15pm) but this talk by Michael Tonsmeire about the growing hoppy sour style should be a good one.

Baltimore has a lot of neighbourhoods. Over 200 of them.  With a neighbourhood culture like Baltimore’s it’s worth doing some exploring, so let’s talk about some of the good beer places that you can take in some local flavour outside of the conference (see at the end of this article a map of all the spots referred to to help you navigate around).

Heavy Seas Alehouse. Picture courtesy Visit Baltimore.

Heavy Seas Alehouse. Photo courtesy Visit Baltimore.

The Homebrew Con itself is at the Baltimore Convention Center, which is right in the heart of the city, in the Inner Harbor and close to the waterfront.  Kitty-corner to the convention center is the Pratt Street Ale House, featuring house beers from Oliver Brewing (the longest running brewpub in Baltimore) alongside about a half-dozen guest taps.  For baseball and beer fans, nearby is Dempsey’s Brew Pub, named after the famous catcher of the Baltimore Orioles.  And just up on N Eataw St lies Alewife Baltimore, an impressive spot with nearly 40 craft beers on tap.

To the south of downtown is Federal Hill, where folks  of days past watched the bombs bursting in air.  You can find bars bursting with beer here, such as the dozen house-brewed beers and pizza at Pub Dog, and 20 draughts from the local region and beyond at tavern Brewer’s Cask.

Around the harbor leads to the historic, waterfront neighbourhood Fell’s Point, and the long-standing Baltimore beer institution Max’s Taphouse.  Max’s was here before everyone else (or so it seems to an outsider), and they still top them all.  With over 100 taps available, Max’s has a beast of a beer menu, and one hell of a draught lineup to celebrate the homebrewers this week.  Undoubtedly and deservedly so, Max’s will be a hotspot for Hawaiian shirt wearing homebrewers in the days to come.  Also worth checking out closeby is the well-known Heavy Seas Alehouse, featuring a wide range of house brewed beers.

A bit farther east in formerly-blue-collar-turned-condo neighbourhood of Canton is Of Love and Regret, a pub with 25 taps and the home of Stillwater Artisanal Ales.  Find a great collection of Stillwater and some other goodies here.  Nearby you could also check out the Baltimore Taphouse with about a dozen or so craft taps, and Mahaffey’s Pub with over 20 taps and a good skew towards local brews.

Union Craft Brewing. Picture courtesy Visit Baltimore.

Union Craft Brewing. Photo courtesy Visit Baltimore.

Head north through Mount Vernon and check out The Brewer’s Art, a brewpub with a large rotating selection of house-made beers, and onward further north and a bit west to the neighbourhoods of Hampden (hipsters!), Roosevelt Park and Woodberry for a cluster of interesting spots.  If you like reading while you drink, the indie Atomic Books has Eightbar in the back with craft beer available. Birroteca Baltimore focuses on pizza and craft beer, with 20+ taps available with good local representation. For some local brewery taproom action, check out Waverly Brewing with around eight brews going, and Union Craft Brewing with a range of their diverse lineup available.

The Homebrew Con is always a good time. I tell people that it’s the best money they will ever spend on a beer event, in part due to the sheer amount of styles, tastes and sampling that one can do at it.  But it’s also just a great down-to-earth celebration of beer, by some of the most passionate beer folks out there.  It’s friendly, often a little bit crazy, sometimes inappropriate, but always enjoyable.  Connect with us on Twitter and let’s have a homebrew this week!

A Beer At…The Publican

A Beer At…The Publican

The Bar Towel is proud to present a new series entitled “A Beer At…”, where we feature a single bar or restaurant, have a beer there and get a feel for what makes them special. Our first visit is to Chicago’s famed The Publican, a shrine to beer and pork in the city’s hot Fulton Market/West Loop area.

DSC04757

The Publican’s European beer hall feel is unmistakeable.

The Publican in Chicago is a beer destination in every sense. It is grand, it is unique, and the beers are always interesting, delicious and selected with an evident sense of great care and appreciation. It’s a place where I make it a point to stop in for a beer every time I’m in Chicago, so it’s a fitting to be the first feature of our new “A Beer At…” series, where we visit special beer spots and find out what makes them great. And in this first feature we are also fortunate to have a live chat with Adam Vavrick, Beer Director of The Publican for a complementary Bar Towel Radio podcast.

Upon entering The Publican you know you’re somewhere different. It’s a large, open space with numerous large communal tables lining the floor and rows of grand, bulbous lights hanging from the ceiling, reminiscent of a European beer hall. You can’t help but notice the massive murals of pig artwork adorning the walls – they love their pork (and more) here and aren’t shy to feature this fine animal throughout.

The Publican can be a place of juxtaposition. Although meticulously designed and refined, there is a definite casual and fun air to the place, with classic cheese rock jams from Journey, Aerosmith and Bon Jovi emanating through the bar on an early evening on Saturday. It’s a place where fun and fine come together seamlessly.

Local food is important to The Publican, and across their menu highlights of pork, oysters, fish and cheese, farmers or location are identified to provide provenance. And local beer is also important, but a wider reach is featured on the beer menu. Within their twelve draught taps alone five states are featured from the U.S.A., alongside Germany, Austria, Belgium and the Netherlands. Breweries represented on tap at my visit included The Bruery, Stone, Left Hand, Half Acre, Allagash, Lindemans, Krombach, Andechs, Hirt and Koningshoeven. An extensive bottle list also includes the U.K., Japan, Canada and vintage offerings such at Aventinus, JW Lees and Orval. The beer list changes regularly, and every visit will provide a new experience when browsing the excellent menu.

DSC04763

The delicious Lambic Doux, served in a clay pitcher.

Now we’re here to have a beer, and the beer we’re having is Lambic Doux. This is one of the most unique beers you’ll find in Chicago, as it is literally one-of-a-kind at the Publican. The Lambic Doux is The Publican’s house blend lambic that features a unique mix of added flavours in small batch quantities. Served in a clay pitcher, having the Lambic Doux is a delicious and special treat, almost a sensory teleportation taking you from the bustle of the city to the farm table of Belgium. At this visit the Lambic Doux was flavoured with blackberry, mint and lemongrass, an orangey-pink hued beer with a light head and a rich sourness, with the added flavours evident. It’s simply delicious and a beer I find time for during every Chicago visit – and so should you.

The Publican is a dynamite place for a beer, and luckily during my visit I was able to have a quick chat with Adam Vavrick, the newly hired Beer Director of The Publican, which we are happy to present as as Bar Towel Radio podcast here. The podcast complements this feature, as you’ll hear from Adam about his background, The Publican’s beer philosophy and other interesting tidbits about this wonderful place. Give a listen below, on our Podcasts page, or via iTunes:

 

The Publican is located at 837 W. Fulton Market in the Fulton Market / West Loop area of Chicago. Formerly an industrial and meatpacking district, this area has transformed in recent years to house some of the city’s most renowned restaurants and bars. Across N. Green Street facing The Publican is their offshoot Publican Quality Meats, a delicious casual spot with sandwiches, beer and meat and food to go. The Publican will also be opening a location at O’Hare Airport in the near future.  The Publican is open afternoons and evenings seven days a week, with daytime brunch on weekends.

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